Caring for
a loved one

Help your loved one with hearing loss live a better life. Accepting hearing loss can be very difficult for those experiencing it and it might be ignored for a long time. It’s often seen as private, stigmatised and embarrassing and it isn’t always easy as a relative to know how to help. Hearing loss has a huge impact on quality of life, not only for the person with a hearing loss but also for those around them, and the sooner action is taken, the better. 

Helping someone who has hearing loss

Do you suspect that someone you love may have hearing loss?

These can be some of the early signs of hearing loss:

  • you continually need to speak louder for them to hear
  • you get the sense your loved one is missing out on parts of conversation
  • you ask them to turn down the volume on the TV
  • you see loved ones struggling to be engaged in conversation when background noise is present
Learn more about signs of hearing loss

Hearing loss can be hard to accept

A lot of people have trouble accepting the fact their hearing isn’t as good as it once was. Hearing loss might seem embarrassing to them, or a sign of aging or weakness. But being unable to hear can have a negative effect on their relationships, health and quality of life. 

What’s most upsetting is when you see someone you care about start to withdraw from the parts of life they enjoy because they’re unable to hear. You might have even noticed a personality change. 

Take action

The longer they wait to do something about hearing loss, the bigger the problem can become. 

While it can be tough to help a loved one with hearing loss, it can be done – and it can help set them on the path to better hearing and a more enjoyable social life.

How you can help

One of the biggest struggles for those dealing with hearing loss is finding the right support.

Here’s a few ways you can help:

  • Let the person you care about know that you want them to be more involved with the world around them.
  • Suggest they have their hearing checked by a hearing care professional.
  • Tell them about the many prominent people who use hearing aids, such as Bill Clinton.
  • Help them get over stereotypes about bulky and ugly hearing aids by searching online for some of the latest small and powerful hearing technology. 
  • Remind them that the success rate of hearing loss treatment is high, so they have nothing to lose and everything to gain.
  • Give them time. It can be difficult for people to accept they have hearing loss.
  • Be supportive and quietly persistent.